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Slideshow

Symposium on the Book Events

The Symposium on the Book at the University of Georgia Events

Between the presentations of Drs. Nora Galland and Emmanuelle Peraldo and Drs. Mario Erasmo and Miriam Jacobson we are delighted to offer a box lunch to symposium attendees. Lunch is free, but please register well before the event so we know how many to order. Space is limited, so priority will be given to UGA students, faculty, and staff and to symposium speakers.  Registration: https://forms.gle/aCfuXAtDND8VTwyC6
Dr. Mario Erasmo is Professor and Head of the Classics Department at the University of Georgia. He writes: "As a Cultural Historian, I take an interdisciplinary approach to explore the Legacy of Classical Antiquity. My historical walking guides: Strolling Through Rome: The Definitive Walking Guide to the Eternal City (2015) and Strolling Through Florence: The Definitive Walking Guide to the Renaissance City (2018) take visitors step-by-step…
Dr. Emmanuelle Peraldo, Professor of British Literature and History of 18th-Century Ideas, has worked extensively on Defoe and Swift. She is also interested in travel literature. Her approach is transdisciplinary and she is particularly interested in the fields of ecocriticism, geocriticism and animal studies. Dr Nora Galland, Associate Professor, researches Premodern Critical Race Studies (PCRS) with a focus on early modern English drama, the…
Dr. Camp’s masterclass will focus on a curious Book of Hours held by UGA’s special collections libraries that combines different localized artistic and religious traditions in the later Middle Ages. Together, the talks, plenary, and master class will balance creative practice with scholarly expertise, contemporary and theoretical approaches with historical perspectives, and cross-disciplinary conversations with hands-on learning. Collectively,…
Sujata Iyengar (UGA English), Nora Benedict (UGA Romance Languages), Jennifer Low (FAU English) Drs. Iyengar and Low’s talks will respond to Coley’s work by analyzing further the relationship between Shakespeare and contemporary book arts and artists’ books. Dr. Benedict’s talk brings a new perspective to the medieval and early modern papers by attending to artists’ books from contemporary Latin America. Jennifer A. Low is the…
Join three experts in pre-modern book and textual history -- Drs. Sargan, Mattison, and Jacobson -- as they share scholarship on new ways to read medieval and Renaissance book bindings through Queer and Trans theory, attention to fragments, and historical fantasies about binding. Free and welcome to the public! About Symposium on the Book: This two-day event unites talks from book historians and practicing book artists,…
Masked Purpose: The Aesthetics of Negative Space Suzanne Coley writes: "Can thoughts, emotions, and experiences be preserved and contributed for the collective benefit of humanity? Well known literary tools have been used to pass human experience through the ages. Livre d’Artiste, or book arts, is one of the counterpart art forms that can be used for this purpose. One of my ongoing book art series, Love Sonnets from Shakespeare to Baltimore,…
Kim Coles is Professor of English, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Classics at the University of Maryland. Her current book, Bad Humor: Race and Religious Essentialism in Early Modern England, just appeared from the University of Pennsylvania Press.The book uncovers how belief itself — the excess, defect, or lack of religion — was largely apprehended and understood in terms of temperament in the early modern period. Race in this period…
Professor Kim Coles (Professor of English, Maryland), along with our colleague David Diamond (Assistant Professor of English and African American Studies, Georgia) will run a rare books centered workshop open to the public in the University of Georgia’s Special Collections Libraries building centered on the history of enslavement in conjunction with the 250th anniversary of the publication of Phyllis Wheatley Peters's book of poetry, the first…
   "‘We had not thus trespassed against your consent’: The Blackamoor Poems by Henry Rainold and Henry King (1630s-1650s)." In this talk, Dr. Adams explores a companion set of seventeenth-century poems that appear in both manuscript and print: Henry Rainolds’s 'A Black-moor Maid wooing a fair Boy,' and Henry King’s response 'The Boy’s Answer to the Blackmoor.' After considering some of the ways that English poets interpolate and…

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